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DBE: Design thinking and education

Books

Design Thinking for Education : Conceptions and Applications in Teaching and Learning [eBook]

This book explores how design thinking vocabulary can be interpreted and employed in educational contexts. The theoretical foundations of design thinking and design in education are first examined by means of a literature review. Intended for teachers, teacher educators and university instructors, this book aims to provide them with the theoretical foundations needed to grasp design thinking, and to provide examples of how design thinking can be interpreted and evaluated.

Taking Design Thinking to School : How the Technology of Design Can Transform Teachers, Learners, and Classrooms.

While design thinking projects make engineering, design, and technology fluency more tangible and personal for young learners, their embrace of ambiguity and failure as growth opportunities often clash with institutional values and structures. Through in-depth case studies that honor and explore such tensions, the authors demonstrate that design thinking provides students with the agency and compassion that is necessary for doing creative and collaborative work, both in and out of the classroom.

Design Education : Creating Thinkers to Improve the World.

This book is a curricular resource that offers theoretical concepts and practical advice for teaching lessons in design to PreK-12 grade students. The book is for art educators at the preK-12 level in schools, museums, and enrichment programs, and university professors in teacher preparation programs. Design education is about problem-solving, learning through objects of our daily lives, and the role design plays in social responsibility and the creative economy. Designers utilize research methods, technology, sketching, and the construction of prototypes.

Design Thinking

Design Thinking is an approach to designing products, services, architecture, spaces and experiences that is being quickly adopted by designers, architects and some of the world’s leading brands such as GE, Target, SAP, Procter and Gamble, IDEO and Intuit. It is being taught at leading universities including Stanford and Harvard. Design Thinking creates practical and innovative solutions to problems. It drives repeatable innovation and business value. Design Thinking can be used to develop a wide range of products, services, experiences and strategy. It is an approach that can be applied by anyone.

Design Thinking Research

This book summarizes the results of the third year in the Design Thinking Research Program, a joint venture of Stanford University in Palo Alto and the Hasso Plattner Institute in Potsdam. Understanding the evolution of innovation, and how to measure the performance of the design thinking teams behind innovations, is the central motivation behind the research work presented in this book.

Design in Educational Technology

 The broad concepts of design, design thinking, the design process, and the design studio, are identified and they form the framework of the book.This book advocates the conscious adoption of a mindset of design thinking, such as that evident in a range of divergent professions including business, government, and medicine.An examination of the design process as practiced, of new models for design, and of ways to connect theory to the development of educational products are all fully explored with the goal of providing guidance for emerging instructional designers and deepening the practice of more advanced practitioners

Creative development: Transforming Education Through Design Thinking, Innovation, and Invention.

Most educators agree that encouraging creativity must become a central goal in the classroom, but they face an ongoing struggle to build and maintain an environment that promotes their students' creative development. This book equips educators with the theory, strategies, and tactics that allow creativity to flourish and gives practical, real-life examples of successfully fostering creative development in education.

Design Thinking

Dit boek ontrafelt het denk- en werkproces dat aan design thinking ten grondslag ligt en biedt praktische handvatten om aan de slag te gaan met design thinking. De auteur benadert design  thinking in vier hoofdstukken op verschillende manieren: als denkwijze, werkwijze, projectaanpak en een verzameling methoden.  Tot slot zijn de methoden en tools die je inzet bij een designproject in Design thinking is een verzameling methoden als naslagwerk bij elkaar gebracht

Journal articles

 

Pande, M., & Bharathi, S. V. (in press). Theoretical foundations of design thinking – A constructivism learning approach to design thinking. Thinking Skills and Creativity. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tsc.2020.100637

Highlights: -  A constructivism learning approach to Design Thinking was proposed, - A taxonomy of constructivism learning tenets was developed, - Tenets of constructivism were mapped to different stages of the Design Thinking process, - A comprehensive teaching-learning pedagogy for Design Thinking through the application of constructivism theory was offered, - A constructivism tenets-design thinking dashboard to link constructivism to the design thinking process was created.

 

Haughton, N. A. (2019). Active learning strategies and competency-based design in research education: A longitudinal review. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 19(4), 58–77. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1234119.pdf

Abstract: This paper describes the long-term re-development of an introductory graduate research methods course. The initial design is presented, followed by the two re-design phases. Phase 2 introduced additional inquiry-based strategies such as concept mapping and multiple levels of peer collaboration. Phase 3 incorporated competency-based techniques as well as additional technical, social, and instructional support. Assessment results, student feedback, moderate to strong relationships between scores on key assessments, and design principles support the assertion that the Phase 3 course is an improvement over the Phase 1 version. Limitations and further research are presented.

 

Van Diggelen, M.R., Doulougeri, K.I., Gomez-Puente, S.M. Bombaerts, G., Dirkx, H., & Kamp, R.J.A. (2019). Coaching in design-based learning: A grounded theory approach to create a theoretical model and practical propositions. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10798-019-09549-x Retrieved from https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10798-019-09549-x

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine what good coaching during design-based learning (DBL) entails by integrating theoretical and practical perspectives on good coaching. For this purpose, a grounded theory approach was used. For the practical perspective, themes on good coaching were derived from a qualitative study on coaching by observing and interviewing teachers and students involved in a DBL project. For the theoretical perspective, we consulted and analyzed literature on scaffolding, feedback, and formative assessment and coaching in problem-based learning from the learning sciences and the studio model from arts and design literature. Synthesizing themes from both perspectives led to the development of a theoretical coaching model consisting of three main categories (and four subcategories), seventeen themes and thirteen propositions. The model and propositions might be of use for those involved in coaching students in DBL and provide relevant directions for research on coaching in DBL.

 

Geitz, G., & De Geus, J. (2019). Design-based education, sustainable teaching, and learning. Cogent education, 6(1). Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/2331186X.2019.1647919?needAccess=true

Abstract: Societal developments necessitate the continuing development of higher education, as labor markets are in full swing and professions are shifting in orientation or sometimes disappear completely. Therefore, a concomitant goal of higher education should be to help students develop metacognitive skills and domain specific knowledge and skills. For many years, competence-based education and problem-based learning have dominated higher education. In this article, an overview of the principles and development of these concepts is given. Subsequently, based on self-regulation theory, approaches to learning and the demands of our society to learn how to face wicked problems, a sustainable approach to teaching and learning are outlined in this conceptual article. The multiple layers from which a sustainable learning environment should be built provide guidance for instructors during the design of their educational practice. Practical implications for educators to approach the transition to sustainable learning environments are given in the form of questions that can shape the dialogue on sustainable education.

 

Matthews, J., & Wrigley, C. (2017). Design and design thinking in business and management higher education. Journal of Learning Design, 10(1), 41-54. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1127723.pdf

Abstract: Design and design thinking have been identified as making valuable contributions to business and management, and the numbers of higher education programs that teach design thinking to business students, managers and executives are growing. However multiple definitions of design thinking and the range of perspectives have created some confusion about potential pathways. This paper examines notions of design and design thinking and uses these definitions to identify themes in higher educational programs. We present the findings from an initial exploratory investigation of design and design thinking in higher education business programs and define four distinct educational approaches around human centred innovation, integrative thinking, design management and design as strategy. Potential directions for management education programs are presented.

 

Scheer, A., Noweski, C., & Meinel, C. (2012). Transforming constructivist learning into action: Design thinking in education. Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, 17(3), 8-19   . Retrieved form https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ996067.pdf

Abstract: In an ever changing society of the 21st century, there is a demand to equip students with meta  competences going beyond cognitive knowledge. Education, therefore, needs a transition from  transferring knowledge to developing individual potentials with the help of constructivist learning. Advantages of constructivist learning, and criteria for its realisation have been well-determined through  theoretical findings in pedagogy (Reich 2008, de Corte, OECD 2010). However, the practical  implementation leaves a lot to be desired (Gardner 2010, Wagner 2011). Knowledge acquisition is still  fragmented into isolated subjects. Lesson layouts are not efficiently designed to help teachers execute a  holistic and interdisciplinary learning. As is shown in this paper, teachers are having negative classroom  experience with project work or interdisciplinary teaching, due to a constant feeling of uncertainty and chaos, as well as lack of a process to follow. We therefore conclude: there is a missing link between  theoretical findings and demands by pedagogy science and its practical implementation. We claim that,  design Thinking as a team-based learning process offers teachers support towards practice-oriented and  holistic modes of constructivist learning in projects. Our case study confirms an improvement of  classroom experience for teacher and student alike when using Design Thinking. This leads to a positive  attitude towards constructivist learning and an increase of its implementation in education. The ultimate goal of this paper is to prove that Design Thinking gets teachers empowered to facilitate constructivist  earning in order to foster 21st century skills.

 

Gray, C.M. (2013). Factors that shape design thinking. Design and technology Education: An International Journal, 18(3), 8-20. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1119596.pdf

Abstract: In an ever changing society of the 21st century, there is a demand to equip students with meta  competences going beyond cognitive knowledge. Education, therefore, needs a transition from  transferring knowledge to developing individual potentials with the help of constructivist learning. Advantages of constructivist learning, and criteria for its realisation have been well-determined through  theoretical findings in pedagogy (Reich 2008, de Corte, OECD 2010). However, the practical  implementation leaves a lot to be desired (Gardner 2010, Wagner 2011). Knowledge acquisition is still  fragmented into isolated subjects. Lesson layouts are not efficiently designed to help teachers execute a  holistic and interdisciplinary learning. As is shown in this paper, teachers are having negative classroom  experience with project work or interdisciplinary teaching, due to a constant feeling of uncertainty and chaos, as well as lack of a process to follow. We therefore conclude: there is a missing link between  theoretical findings and demands by pedagogy science and its practical implementation. We claim that,  design Thinking as a team-based learning process offers teachers support towards practice-oriented and  holistic modes of constructivist learning in projects. Our case study confirms an improvement of  classroom experience for teacher and student alike when using Design Thinking. This leads to a positive  attitude towards constructivist learning and an increase of its implementation in education. The ultimate goal of this paper is to prove that Design Thinking gets teachers empowered to facilitate constructivist  earning in order to foster 21st century skills.

 

Munyai, K. (2016). Design thinking: A methodology towards sustainable problem solving in higher education in South Africa. In P. Kommers, T. Issan, TH. Issa, E. McKay & P. Isaias (Eds.), Proceedings of the International Conferences Internet Technologies & Society , Melbourne, Australia, December 2016 (pp. 306-310). S.l.: International Association for Development of the Information Society. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED571612.pdf

Abstract: This short paper explores the potential contribution of design thinking methodology to the education and training system in South Africa. Design thinking is slowly gaining traction in South Africa. Design Thinking is gaining traction in South Africa. There is offered by the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design Thinking at the University of Cape Town geared towards empowering postgraduate students with extra skills set that are needed for sustainable development to be realised. This kind of training fulfill a need that has been discussed for years in South Africa. The need is for the higher education to empower graduates with knowledge and skills that will make a difference to society. South Africa has been continuously producing graduates that are unemployable and lack the ability to innovate and add value to society.

 

Gilbert, C. G., Crow, M. M., & anderson, D. (2018). Design thinking for higher education. Stanford Social Innovation Review, 16(1), 36-41. Retrieved from Business Source Complete https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=126353268&site=eds-live&scope=site&authtype=ip,shib&custid=s1242078

Abstract: The article presents information on design thinking for higher education. Topics discussed include architectural choices for organizational change, changing student demographics, and evolving stakeholder demands. Also being discussed are the challenges facing higher education in the contemporary era.

 

Welsh, M. A., & Dehler, G. E. (2013). Combining critical reflection and design thinking to develop integrative learners. Journal Of Management Education, 37(6), 771. doi:10.1177/1052562912470107  Retrieved from http://journals.sagepub.com.000006923288.access.stenden.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1052562912470107?

Abstract: The authors describe the development of a student-centered learning experience that combines elements of critical management education, situated learning, and design thinking. The commonalities between a critically based pedagogy and design thinking create a context for collaboration that enables students to acquire attributes consistent with integrative learners: critical reflection, multiliteracy, the ability to negotiate identity, engage in constructive critique, become skilled in knowledge transformation, and create tangible and implementable outcomes. Drawing from 13 years of pedagogical experimentation, this article contributes to the domain of management education by providing greater specification to the concept of integrative learning, as well as articulating a novel and effective pedagogy based in design thinking.

 

Dunne, D., & Martin, R. (2006). Design thinking and how it will change management education: An interview and discussion. Academy Of Management Learning & Education, 5(4), 512-523. doi:10.5465/AMLE.2006.23473212. Retrieved from https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=23473212&site=eds-live&scope=site&authtype=ip,shib&custid=s1242078

Abstract: Roger Martin, dean of the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, is interviewed on the subject of "design thinking"--approaching managerial problems as designers approach design problems--and its potential impact on management education. Under a design-thinking paradigm, students would be encouraged to think broadly about problems, develop a deep understanding of users, and recognize the value in the contributions of others. In Martin's view, the concept of design thinking can potentially address many of the criticisms currently being leveled at MBA programs. The interview is followed by a discussion and critique of the themes Martin raises

 

Miller, R.K., & Linder, B. (2015). Is design thinking the new liberal arts of education? Olin College of Engineering. Geraadpleegd van http://www.olin.edu/sites/default/files/oct_15_design_thinking.pdf

This paper attempts to provide an introduction to Design Thinking and its role in the education of every graduate at Olin College of Engineering. We make the case that Design Thinking, in addition to its usefulness in developing answers to problems, is a power tool for student empowerment and potentially transformational in its ability to inspire intrinsic motivation, entrepreneurial mindset and commitment to making a positive difference in the world. 

DOCK20 Building inspiring learning communities

Making new moves / Manuela Hernández Sánchez (Ed.)

This book is an outcome of the Erasmus+ strategic cooperation project ‘MoveMakers: Co- Creating New Ways of Learning’. It is directly tied to the book ‘MoveMakers on the Move: The Story of Our Learning Journey’ and the documentary about MoveMakers.

Connected to this book are forty educators from five different countries and the various learning communities that they represent. During the MoveMakers Learning Journey, they visited each other's countries, hosted meaningful conversations and  learned together. One of the results of this collective learning is this book: Eleven MoveMakers share the inspiration, insights and learnings gathered during our nighteenmonth learning adventure.

Design Thinkers Academy Network

This network aims is to create an open platform to facilitate and inspire a rich conversation between creative thinkers and doers and to develop a learning community to have a positive impact on peoples lives, careers and our ever-changing world.